The Messenger Astronomical Science

KLASS – The Role of Low-Mass Galaxies from Cosmic Dawn to Cosmic Noon

Authors
  • Fontana, Adriano [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Italy]
  • Mason, Charlotte A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, USA; Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, USA]
  • Girard, Marianne [Observatoire de Genève, Université de Genève, Switzerland.]
  • Treu, Tommaso [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, USA]
  • Jones, Tucker [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, USA]
  • Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava [Observatoire de Genève, Université de Genève, Switzerland.]
  • Morishita, Takahiro [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, USA]
  • Pentericci, Laura [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Italy]
  • Schmidt, Kasper [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany]
  • Wang, Xin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, USA]

Section
Astronomical Science
Abstract

The KMOS Lens-Amplified Spectroscopic Survey (KLASS) is an ESO Large Programme that uses the KMOS infrared spectrograph to investigate the role of low-mass galaxies at several epochs of cosmic time. KLASS has targeted galaxies behind massive clusters, using gravitational amplification and stretching to observe galaxies that are intrinsically very faint. By pushing KMOS to the limits of its capabilities, we have obtained new constraints on the timescale of the reionisation process, finding that the intergalactic medium was almost completely neutral at a redshift of around 8, and that turbulence plays a major role in shaping low mass galaxies at intermediate redshifts (0.5 < z < 2).


Dates
Created: 2019-06-01/2019-06-30
Length
4 pages

Cite this article:

A. Fontana, C. Mason, M. Girard, T. Treu, T. Jones, M. Dessauges-Zavadsky, T. Morishita, L. Pentericci, K. Schmidt, X. Wang; KLASS – The Role of Low-Mass Galaxies from Cosmic Dawn to Cosmic Noon. The Messenger 176 (June 2019): 33–36. https://doi.org/10.18727/0722-6691/5139